YES these items can go in the red-lidded bin.
  • Plastic bags*
  • Plastic wrap*
  • Soft plastics*
  • Biodegradable/degradable plastics  
  • Nappies
  • Waxed cardboard
  • Broken crockery or glasses
  • Foam, styrofoam trays (meat trays)
  • Polystyrene*
  • Broken toys*
  • Broken household items*
  • Wire*
  • Rope
  • Clothing or shoes*
  • Feminine hygiene products
  • Takeaway coffee cups
  • Timber offcuts*
  • Vacuum dust
NO these items can’t go in the red-lidded bin.
  • Recyclable items e.g. paper, cardboard, hard plastics*
  • Organic items e.g. food scraps, leftovers
  • Green waste e.g. garden pruning’s, grass clippings, weeds* 
  • Batteries*
  • Chemicals, hazardous waste*
  • Paint, oil*
  • Gas and helium cylinders* 
  • Car parts, car batteries* 
  • Computer parts
  • Electronic and e-waste*
  • Printers, printer cartridges*
  • Prunings
  • Syringes, medical waste
  • Building materials*
  • Scrap metal*
  • Fluorescent lights, globes*
YES these items can go in the red-lidded bin.
  • Plastic bags*
  • Plastic wrap*
  • Soft plastics*
  • Biodegradable/degradable plastics  
  • Food Waste^
  • Garden Waste^
  • Nappies
  • Waxed cardboard
  • Broken crockery or glasses
  • Foam, styrofoam trays (meat trays)
  • Polystyrene*
  • Broken toys*
  • Broken household items*
  • Wire*
  • Rope
  • Clothing or shoes*
  • Feminine hygiene products
  • Takeaway coffee cups
  • Timber offcuts*
  • Vacuum dust
NO these items can’t go in the red-lidded bin.
  • Recyclable items e.g. paper, cardboard, hard plastics*
  • Batteries*
  • Chemicals, hazardous waste*
  • Paint, oil*
  • Prunings
  • Gas and helium cylinders* 
  • Car parts, car batteries* 
  • Computer parts*
  • E-waste and electronics*
  • Printers, printer cartridges*
  • Syringes, medical waste*
  • Building materials*
  • Scrap metal*
  • Fluorescent lights, globes*

Although the above items can go into your red-lidded general waste bin, did you know that there are alternatives to recycle many items that were destined to go to landfill? By opting to use these specialised recycling alternatives, it is your way of contributing to looking after the environment and reducing our waste to landfill. 

The items listed above with an * asterisk can be dropped off at your local recycle/transfer centre or alternative specialised recycling location, such as REDcycle for clean soft plasticsThese items are then recycled through specific programs to keep as much recyclable and hazardous waste out of landfill.

^You can remove your organic material (food scraps and green waste) by composting at home or feeding your food scraps to your chickens- they will repay you with eggs! 

Although
 the above items can go into your red-lidded general waste bin, did you know that there are alternatives to recycle many items that were destined to go to landfill? By opting to use these specialised recycling alternatives, it is your way of contributing to looking after the environment and reducing our waste to landfill. 

The items listed above with an * asterisk can be dropped off at your local recycle/transfer centre or alternative specialised recycling location, such as REDcycle for clean soft plasticsThese items are then recycled through specific programs to keep as much recyclable and hazardous waste out of landfill.

WHERE DOES IT GO?  

PROBLEM WASTE

A-Z What belongs in general waste

polystyrene Recycling

Wheelie Bin Tips

Problem Waste is Waste that Cannot go into Any of your Kerbside Bins. 


These items 
include household & car batteries, gas bottles/cylinders, motor & cooking oil, paint, light globes/fluro tubes, smoke detectors and fire extinguishers. 

Problem waste items are known to cause serious harm to the people involved in transferring or processing the waste material as well as causing fires, chemical spills and other preventable disasters. This is why these items cannot go into any of your kerbside bins. 

Problem Waste must be dropped off at designated transfer stations and recycling centres so they can be recycled and disposed of correctly, without harming people, wildlife and the environment. 

When recycled correctly, Problem Waste is turned into reusable materials which can then be used in new products. 

Plus, it helps to protect natural resources and eliminate toxic materials ending up in landfill.

What Goes in the Red-Lidded General Waste Bin?

A – C

  • Ash – no hot ash
  • Baby wipes
  • Backpacks
  • Baskets
  • Biodegradable plastic
  • CDs
  • Cellophane
  • Ceramics
  • Bleach
  • Bread tags
  • Bubble wrap
  • Candles
  • Carbon paper
  • Cereal bags
  • Chip packets
  • Cigarette butts and ashes/ cigars
  • Cling wrap
  • Cloth
  • Cloth nappies
  • Clothing
  • Coffee bags
  • Coffee pods
  • Cosmetics

D – L

  • Dental floss
  • Detergents and soaps
  • Dirt, soil or sand
  • Disposable nappies
  • Drinking glasses
  • DVDs
  • Fabric
  • Feminine hygiene products
  • Fertilisers
  • Foam boxes
  • Foam meat trays
  • Foam take-away containers
  • Foil wrappers
  • General garbage
  • Glad wrap
  • Irrigation & garden hoses
  • Laminated paper
  • Laminated wood/timber
  • Leather items
  • Lolly wrap

M – R

  • Masonite
  • MDF
  • Medical waste
  • Mirror glass
  • Nappies
  • Painted wood/timber
  • Pesticides, herbicides and fungicide treated organics
  • Pet excrement in plastic bags
  • Photos
  • Picture frames
  • Pillows
  • Plant pots (ceramic)
  • Plastic bags
  • Plastic sachets
  • Plastic wraps
  • Plywood
  • Polystyrene
  • Rope
  • Rubber

S – Z

  • Sawdust from treated timber
  • Shoes
  • Soft plastics
  • Stickers
  • Strapping, plastic
  • String
  • Styrofoam
  • Takeaway coffee cups
  • Toothpaste tubes
  • Toys (no batteries)
  • Treated timber
  • Treated wood
  • Vacuum cleaner dust and bags
  • Wine cask insert
  • Wine cork
  • Wrappers, plastic
  • X-ray films
  • Waxed cardboard and paper

Polystyrene Recycling

Polystyrene or also know as EPS, is the white packaging that can be found when buying new appliances such as a refrigerator or television and even packaging around children’s toys.

Polystyrene can not go in your yellow lidded bin. If you have a large quantity of polystyrene, but don’t want to put it in your red lidded bin, Halve Waste provides free polystyrene drop-off locations in Albury, Wodonga, Beechworth and Rutherglen for household quantities of polystyrene. Why not take it to your nearest drop-off station.

What happens to the polystyrene? The polystyrene is processed at Albury Recycling Centre and is melted down into dense blocks, and these blocks can then be reprocessed into objects such as insulation for housing and photo frames.

Please note that all polystyrene recyclables dropped off must be clean and dry material to be accepted for recycling.

Wheelie Bin Tips

Our collection vehicles use a mechanical arm to lift and empty your bins. Here is a 10-tip guide to help you correctly place your bins out on collection day.

Label Your Bins

Put your number on your bin, especially if you are in a unit complex.

Timing

Put your bins at the kerbside for collection the night before or by 6am on the morning of collection.

Not Too Close

Place your bins away from overhanging trees, as these get in the way of the truck.

Bin Placement

Close to the kerb – at least 1 metre apart and away from trees, cars, and other obstructions. Wheels towards the property.

Don’t Overfill

The bin lid must be closed for collection. The truck’s mechanical arm cannot lift overfilled bins. Extra items placed on top or next to the bin will not be collected.

Contamination

The wrong items placed in bins could contaminate whole truck loads of material collected for recycling or green waste. This could result in the whole truck being sent to landfill. If contamination is on-going, Cleanaway will have no option but to withdraw your service.

Too Heavy

Be mindful of the materials you are putting in your bin, the truck’s mechanical arm cannot lift over 80kg.

Car Obstructions

Residents are responsible for allowing a clear roadway on bin collection days, blocked roads and limited turning capabilities will prevent bins from being collected.

Moving?

Bins, liners and kitchen caddies are allocated to each property. If you move, don’t take your bins with you. Contact your local council if you don’t have all your bins when you move into a property.

Streetscape

No one likes the look of bins on the kerb for a week! Remember to remove your bins from the kerbside on the day of collection once they have been emptied. Fines apply in certain council areas.

PROBLEM WASTE

A-Z What belongs in general waste

polystyrene Recycling

Guide to Composting

Problem Waste is Waste that Cannot go into Any of your Kerbside Bins.

These items include household & car batteries, gas bottles/cylinders, motor & cooking oil, paint, light globes/fluro tubes, smoke detectors and fire extinguishers. 

Problem waste items are known to cause serious harm to the people involved in transferring or processing the waste material as well as causing fires, chemical spills and other preventable disasters. This is why these items cannot go into any of your kerbside bins. 

Problem Waste must be dropped off at designated transfer stations and recycling centres so they can be recycled and disposed of correctly, without harming people, wildlife and the environment. 

When recycled correctly, Problem Waste is turned into reusable materials which can then be used in new products. 

Plus, it helps to protect natural resources and eliminate toxic materials ending up in landfill.

What Goes in the Red-Lidded General Waste Bin?

A – D

  • Animal waste
  • Ash – no hot ash
  • Baby wipes
  • Backpacks
  • Baked goods
  • Baskets
  • Biodegradable plastic
  • CDs
  • Cellophane
  • Ceramics
  • Bleach
  • Bread tags
  • Bubble wrap
  • Candles
  • Carbon paper
  • Cereal bags
  • Chip packets
  • Cigarette butts and ashes/ cigars
  • Cling wrap
  • Cloth
  • Cloth nappies
  • Clothing
  • Coffee bags
  • Coffee grounds
  • Coffee pods
  • Cosmetics
  • Dental floss
  • Detergents and soaps
  • Dirt, soil or sand
  • Disposable nappies
  • Drinking glasses
  • DVDs

E – N

  • Fabric
  • Feminine hygiene products
  • Fertilisers
  • Foam boxes
  • Foam meat trays
  • Foam take-away containers
  • Foil wrappers
  • Food scraps
  • Fruit fly infested fruit (tie up in a compostable bag)
  • General garbage
  • Glad wrap
  • Irrigation & garden hoses
  • Laminated paper
  • Laminated wood/timber
  • Leftovers
  • Leather items
  • Lollies
  • Lolly wrap
  • Masonite
  • MDF
  • Meat scraps
  • Medical waste
  • Mirror glass
  • Nappies

O – S

  • Painted wood/timber
  • Pesticides, herbicides and fungicide treated organics
  • Pet excrement in plastic bags
  • Photos
  • Picture frames
  • Pillows
  • Plant pots (ceramic)
  • Plastic bags
  • Plastic sachets
  • Plastic wraps
  • Plywood
  • Polystyrene
  • Rope
  • Rubber
  • Salad and dressing
  • Sawdust from treated timber
  • seafood (including bones and shells)
  • Shoes
  • Soft plastics
  • Spoiled food
  • Sticks
  • Stickers
  • Strapping, plastic
  • Straw and hay
  • String
  • Styrofoam

T – Z

  • Takeaway coffee cups
  • Tea bags/leaves
  • Tissues
  • Toilet paper
  • Toothpaste tubes
  • Toys (no batteries)
  • Treated timber
  • Treated wood
  • Vacuum cleaner dust and bags
  • Wine cask insert
  • Wine cork
  • Wrappers, plastic
  • X-ray films
  • Waxed cardboard and paper
  • Weeds
  • Wooden toothpicks

Polystyrene Recycling

Polystyrene or also know as EPS, is the white packaging that can be found when buying new appliances such as a refrigerator or television and even packaging around children’s toys.

Polystyrene can not go in your yellow-lidded bin. If you have a large quantity of polystyrene, but don’t want to put it in your red-lidded bin, Halve Waste provides free polystyrene drop-off locations in Albury, Wodonga, Beechworth and Rutherglen for household quantities of polystyrene. Why not take it to your nearest drop-off station.

What happens to the polystyrene?
The polystyrene is processed at Albury Recycling Centre and is melted down into dense blocks, and these blocks can then be reprocessed into objects such as insulation for housing and photo frames.

Please note that all polystyrene recyclables dropped off must be clean and dry material to be accepted for recycling.

What is Composting?

Composting is natures recycling system – it is the process of decomposition of organic matter into a soil-like material called ‘compost’.

The decomposition process occurs as a result of the activities of beneficial microscopic organisms like bacteria and fungi and other living creatures such as worms and slaters.

Benefits of Composting:

  • Reduction of waste disposed to landfill approx. 40 to 60% of household waste is compostable.
  • Reduction of the production of methane- a powerful greenhouse gas.
  • Enrichment of soil health.
  • Improvement of soil structure and its capacity to hold water.
  • Increases disease resistance in plants.
  • Significantly reduces dependence on artificial fertilisers and pesticides.
  • Can save you money!

What to Compost

Most organic material can be composted. You will produce beautiful, nutrient-rich compost if you add a diverse range of both nitrogen-rich and carbon-rich ingredients to your compost bin or heap.

Check out our list of kitchen and garden wastes that can be added to your compost below.

  • Nitrogen-rich Kitchen Wastes
    Fruit scraps, vegetable peelings, house plant cuttings, coffee grounds, rice and pasta, egg shells, tea bags, vacuum dust, hair.
  • Nitrogen-rich Garden Wastes
    Flowers, vegetables, plant trimmings, hedge clippings, grass clippings, horse, chicken or cow manure.
  • Carbon-rich Kitchen Wastes
    Coffee filters, bread, paper napkins and towels, clothes dryer lint, hair, egg cartons, torn up pizza boxes.
  • Carbon-rich Garden Wastes Leaves, straw or hay, small twigs, mulch, dried grass and weeds.

 

What not to Compost

It is recommended that you do not compost animal products. Although these items can be composted they can cause problems if not composted correctly.

Check out our DO NOT compost list below.

  • Meat, fish or bones
  • Dairy products
  • Oils or fat
  • Chemicals
  • Dog, cat or human faeces
  • Diseased plants
  • Mature weeds with seeds
  • Ashes

For a full guide on how to compost including troubleshooting,
Contact us

How Can I Reduce My Household Waste?

Here are a few tips to help you avoid waste.

Soft plastics can be recycled at your local Coles or Woolworths Supermarket through a program called REDcycleThe REDcycle Program makes it easy for consumers to keep plastic bags and soft plastic packaging out of landfill and instead be recycled into items such as bollards and dog agility equipment. For a comprehensive list of the what is accepted at REDcycle and drop off locations, visit their website HERE 

Donate your pre-loved clothes to charity – as long as they are in good condition!

Put a ‘No Junk Mail’ sticker on your letterbox.

Receive bills and correspondence via email rather than post.

Dilute your strong household cleaners with some water to make them last longer.

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